Friday, December 31

Count Your Chickens Before They Hatch* : My 2011 Genealogy Research & Writing Plan(s)

Image by footnoteMaven

Jasia @ CreativeGene presents the Carnival of Genealogy, no. 101: Your 2011 Genealogy Research/Writing Plan

Call for Submissions! The topic for the 101st edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is: My genealogy research/writing plan for 2011. Figure out what you think you can accomplish in 2011 and write it up on your blog. Then share it with us in the COG! Given this topic choice, there will be no limit on the number of submissions for this edition. The deadline for submissions is January 1, 2011.



I like lists - lists make the world go 'round.  Lists and plans go hand in hand.

Unfortunately for me, I tend to make lists (and plans) on scraps of paper and then subsequently lose said scraps.  Which is why I also tend to write notes on my hand - which works well in theory (I can't lose my hand!)...until I wash my hands, that is.
The Proof: Work list from yesterday, including "Single hole punch", "3.00 Sat" [we're going to "The King's Speech"], and the remains of "ping-pong balls" [for a children's programme]
I am utterly incapable (unless it's on my hand, in which case I am forced by space to contain myself to one-to-three word descriptions) of writing one-sentence goals. My brain and my fingers refuse to comprehend that such lists could (and probably should) be so short. Therefore, feel free to skim (I won't be offended - I know I write too much!), as I present my "2011 Genealogy Research & Writing Plan(s)."

Being the practical soul that I am, I've divided my list up into five categories:

I. Research:

i. Join LCGS
The Lanark County Genealogical Society is an independent local society based in (obviously) Lanark county, Ontario, Canada. Though most of my ancestors settled in neighbouring Carleton and Renfew counties, I do have a few lines in Lanark. And at $20 for the year, I can afford the membership fee (unlike the OGS...)
ii. Acquire Census Records
...as well as civil registrations (as available), for all direct-line ancestors. Due to previous haphazard organization (I'm getting better - see point iii, below), I have some as photocopies, some as pre-printed forms, and some in miscellanous notes.
iii. Become Organized
Ahem...I have a plan, now I just have to stick to it!
iv. Create "Research Dates"
I want to visit the Archives of Ontario (I haven't been to their lovely new building yet) in Toronto at least 3 - 6 times in 2011. (It's not far away - only about 2ish hours by public transit - but it's time and money that is the issue.) I also want to visit the local Family History Centre (I've never been - bad genealogist! ;) as well as (now that the renovations are finally complete!) once more becoming a regular microfilm user at the McLaughlin (and the main) branch of the Oshawa Public Library (I wanted a reader at the branch where I work, but they didn't go for it :(
v. Review Research Plan
I plan to regularly review (and edit, as necessary) my overall research plan. I also plan to draft individual and surname plans, so I am better able to direct my research time (and money).
II. Education:

i. Subscribe to FC
Money is limited (especially at this time of year), but I would like to subscribe to "Family Chronicle" magazine. It's one of the few general genealogy periodicals (outside of genealogy/historical society publications) that I've found which includes Canadian content.
ii. Attend OCAPG Seminar
...with Elizabeth Shown Mills at the North York Central Library (Toronto) in April. My first genealogy seminar! ;)
iii. "Reading Research"
I am a dedicated bookworm as well as a genealogist - and luckily for me, one of my favourite genre's to read is non-fiction! My "reading research" goal includes (but is not limited to) reading a book a month (therefore 12 books) on a different topic, which contributes to my genealogy knowledge base.
iv. French Language Course
Despite living in an offically bilingual country, my French (and high school French at that) is extremely poor. I'm hoping to remedy that this year, by either taking a formal French language (beginners!) course, or informally learning on my own.
v. Online Genealogy Course(s)
I would also like to take an online-based (and hopefully free) genealogy course...any suggestions?
III. Community:

i. Volunteer as a FSIndexer
I just signed up this month, and now I need schedule blocks of time to actually commit to this project.
ii. Comment More!
I don't do enough commenting! I do read everyone's blogs/sites, but my commenting skills are sadly lacking. Therefore, I plan to comment more in the coming year.
IV. Writing:

i. Set Up A Posting Schedule
I plan to sketch out a posting schedule for my blog, including both weekly theme topics as well as "individual" posts. Obviously, I can't schedule everything (life wouldn't be any fun then, would it? ;) but it will at least give me a rough draft of where my blog is heading...and where I want it to go.
ii. Blog Regularly
I want to continue participating in the weekly themes (Tombstone Tuesday, Wordless Wednesday, my own Tabloid Thursday, 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy) as well as blog about other, non-theme-related genealogy topics. (I just have to figure out what those are going to be - see point i. above!)
V. Diversions:
(i.e. Hobbies other than Genealogy - yes, there are some... ;)

i. Keep Writing!
I've been scribbling stories ever since I was a teenager - I have papers, books and binders full (a mountain that rivals the genealogy one!) of beginnings, endings, middlings [is there such a word? ;) ], character outlines, plot outlines, and so forth. I don't have a problem writing - my problem lies in actually completing a story! Therefore, I have two projects I'll be working on in the coming year: 1., an informal "round-robin" that I'm writing with two friends (which I need to stop taking so seriously and just write!); and 2., my sort-of-have-a-plan-and-sort-of-don't "blog story" Bonnets and Bolts: The Journal of Lucretia Stern (for which I need to do some Victorian research - thus helping to fulfill point no. II.iii. above!).

My biggest issue, however, is that my best writing is done in the mornings (I'm not very disciplined, I know) after a cup of coffee. Unfortunately, there is that pesky work thing plus the fact that I like my sleep (and thus like to sleep in). Sacrifices, sacrifices. (Can you tell I have no little ones ;)
ii. Stitch Regularly
A couple of times a year (usually in the summer), I break away from everything else and immerse myself in the world of cross stitching. I've been stitching ever since I received a kit for my 16th birthday...but as with writing, I tend to start projects and rarely finish them. (My internal stitcher has a nasty habit of exclaiming "Oh, shiny!" and making me drop whatever I'm working on at the time to pick up the new (and shiny!) project...that's my excuse, anyway! ;)

So my goal is to finish something...large or small, I don't care. But something will be completely stitched and finished (framed or otherwise) by next December.
iii. Miscellaneous
* Contribute monthly to the OSPCA
* Save money (this is a plan from last year, but several roadblocks in the fall made this impossible...so I'm hoping to get everything back in order come the spring)
* Take up swimming again (the pool is a dozen steps away from work, so what's my excuse!?)
If you've made it this far (I warned you), thanks for reading! I love reading what others are planning (or evaluating last year's plan) and can't wait to see all the CoG entries!

Have a safe and happy new year! See you on the other side...
Jenn ;)

* From a quote by Oscar Wilde (1854-1900): "People who count their chickens before they are hatched, act very wisely, because chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them accurately.”

Wednesday, December 29

Wordless Wednesday: Valcartier Picture Postcard, W. W. I.

Valcartier Camp - Canada. The "Dry" Canteen.
Original in possession of F. Crago, as of 2010. Reverse of postcard is blank, except for pre-printed description.

See GeneaBloggers for more Wordless Wednesday posts.

Tuesday, December 28

Tombstone Tuesday: Core/Robbins/Wannamaker, Oshawa Union

Core/Robbins/Wannamaker gravestone, Oshawa Union Cemetery, Oshawa, Regional Municipality of Durahm (previously East Whitby twp., Ontario co.), Ontario, Canada; visited and photographed by J. L. Cameron,
22 September 2010. Copy in possession of the author.
 
Core / In Memory of / Mary C. Robbins / 1876 - 1922 / Beloved Wife of / Edward A. Core / 1881 - 1960 / Their Daughter / Sadie W. Wannamaker / 1905 - 1981


Please Note: The Core/Robbins/Wannamaker family is not related to me. My own ancestors reside in cemeteries many miles away from my home, and thus, to satisfy my cemetery "cravings" I take photographs in my local cemeteries. If you have someone buried in an Oshawa cemetery, email me - I may have a photograph and if not, I'd be happy to take one for you! Jenn

Sunday, December 26

Holiday Overload (Research Diary, no. 6)

My Research Diary:
Part to-do list...
Part dear diary...
Part Nosy-Nellie...

Weekly events, plans (and a question or two) from my oh-so exciting genealogy (and sometimes non-genealogy) life...

"Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~

What happened this week:

Blog housekeeping...
  • Fiddled around some more on (and added to) my Blogger profile...
  • New followers - hello to everyone and thanks (as always) for reading!  I think I've followed everyone in turn, but if I haven't please let me know!
  • I've added 17 new-to-me blogs to my reading lists - see below (though I'm sure there will be more, as always!)
Genealogy:
  • In a word...not much!  I had three days off work over the holidays, and planned to work on genealogy...  Guess how well that plan turned out!  Nevertheless, it was a good (if quiet) holiday and I'm hoping to get back to my research very soon.  I hope everyone's holidays' were just as good and Santa didn't pass you by! :) 
  • I did have my regular postings, however, including Tombstone Tuesday (Oshawa Union), Wordless Wednesday (Valcartier picture postcard, part 3), and Tabloid Thursday (immigration, spending and train travel in 1911)...
  • ...as well as "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy", including the results for Week 11 (Transitional Genealogists Forum) and a new challenge for Week 12 (Archive and Library sites).
  • I guess my biggest step (even though it only consisted of a couple of clicks!) was becoming a FamilySearch Indexer.  I can't wait to get started!
  • Thanks to blogs, I found two interesting sites worthy of further investigation: BBC History Magazine's book reviews and a history of the Rise and Fall of the Workhouse from "Anglo-Celtic Connections", a great overview of the Scottish-Gaelic language at Omniglot.com from "a'spaidsearachd agus a'meòrachadh", as well as a book: Great War Commands: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Army Leadership 1914-1918 edited by Andrew B. Godefroy from "Veterans of Southern Ontario".

New-to-me blogs:

What's coming up:
  • My usual Tombstone Tuesday and Tabloid Thursday...
  • ...and Wordless Wednesday brings another Valcartier picture postcard.
  • My results for Week 12 (Archive and Library sites) of "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" and a new challenge post for Week 13 (Cyndi's List).
  • Besides recovering from turkey overload, I'm not quite sure...  We'll just have to see what the week brings!

My Question (among questions!):

Did you get any good genealogical goodies from Santa?

Though nothing overtly genealogical, I did receive a history book about the Black Plague and a Chapters gift card (more books, yay! :)

Thanks for reading!
Jenn

Saturday, December 25

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 12 Challenge : Archives & Libraries

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by GeneaBloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 12:

LAC, Ottawa
Check out the web sites for the Society of American Archivists, ARMA International, and the American Library Association. Genealogists can benefit from the educational opportunities and publications of other information-based organizations. You may not be an archivist, records manager or librarian, but you share the same interests. Look at the events these associations hold. Find the books they publish and see if you can request them through your library via Inter-Library Loan. You may also want to check out your state’s (or country’s) library association. If you’re a genealogy blogger, write about your impressions of one or more of these organizations.

I'll post my results later this week...

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 20 March 2010. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 11 Results

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by Geneabloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 11:

Read the back posts from the Transitional Genealogists Forum. This is a message board for genealogists who are taking the steps needed to become professional genealogists. Even if you aren’t interested in that goal, you will benefit from the questions and answers provided on this excellent discussion list. If you have a genealogy blog, write about a question or subject from this board that was helpful for you.

I found several things of interest, including...

The thread for [TGF] Source Citation Placement from 4 February 2008 for the placement (and discrepencies) of sources within a formal research report.  Of interest, especially if I ever get my butt in gear and write personal research reports, as I would like to (eventually) do...

The thread for Privacy Laws - Canada from 2 August 2008 is something I am sadly lacking in and need to become more aware of...

The post of Organizing and "Publishing" Personal Research (by Connie Sheets) from 8 March 2009 made me think about what I'm doing, how I'm going about it, and where I want my research to go (where my ancestors went is another issue! ;)

The thread for How Do You Track Time on Projects? 26 June 2009 : Since time (whether blogging, researching, or just being "genealogically nosy" (i.e. surfing), tends to drift away from me, I thought this conversation might be of some help...

The thread for Tips for citations in Word 13 August 2009 : Helpful, again, if I ever get to my plan of personal research reports...

The threads for personal research report or status update from 30 August 2009 and Organization of Client Reports from 6 December 2009 : I especially found the response from Elizabeth Shown Mills quite helpful in regarding a format for personal research reports (which I would eventually like to do for my own research...).

The thread for What to call a progenitor whose first name is unknown from 6 January 2010 : I found this conversation interesting since we all have "unknown's", whether progenitor's or not (even though the question itself was asked in conjection with a client research report).

The thread for Henrietta Lacks - example of an interesting research project from 1 February 2010 : This one jumped out at me solely because I have the book that came out of this research - waiting on my TBR shelf! :)

...as well as the numerous threads on various citation formats and discussions on BCG Standards and "Evidence Explained"! Even though I have no (current - I've thought about it though!) plans to "become" professional/certified (though informal "self-education" will always continue), I plan to subscribe to the list regardless.  It's quite a bundle of information! 

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 13 March 2010. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

Yule Blessings, Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays!

Season's Greetings to You and Yours!
(however you celebrate - or even if you don't!)
;)  Jenn

Thursday, December 23

Tabloid Thursday: Immigrants, Money and the Train...

Tabloid Thursday: Where yesterday's news is today...

T.T. is an experimental weekly meme I'm trying here at "Roots & Stones" (please let me know if there are any themes/memes already around like this - I don't want to reinvent the wheel!). 

I wanted a weekly feature where I could showcase articles, those lovely little social news items (i.e. "Mrs. X and daughter visited Mrs. Y this weekend and will be returning home on Thursday..."), and other interesting newspaper "stuff" I've come across in the course of my research.  Thus, Tabloid Thursday...

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~ 

Source: "The Cobalt Daily Nugget" 12 July 1911, p. 2, column 3
Accessed at Google News archive, accessed 22 December 2010.

[Click to enlarge]

RAILWAYS AND IMMIGRANTS.
      For the month of May the railways reached the high-water mark as regards records for the carrying of immigrants.
      During May, 40,000 immigrants, the majority of whom were of British origin, passed through Montreal on their way to Western Canada. The Canadian Pacific carried an average of 1,000 immigrants a day, the Grand Truck had an average of 250 a day.
      These figures form a striking contast for the month of May thirty years ago, when the total immigration into the country was 6,601.
      One railway official said that it was surprising what a big total of hard cash was disbursed in Canada by these immigrants. On an average, he said, they spend in railway fares $15 each, which means a total of $600,000, while expenses of food, beds and other incidentals amount to another $15 by the time they get to their destination. This means that during May British immigrants spent in Canada within the first few days of their arrival considerably over a million dollars.

Wednesday, December 22

Wordless Wednesday: Valcartier Picture Post, W. W. 1

"Valcartier Camp - Canada. Arrival of Western Contingent."

Original in possession of F. Crago, as of 2010. Reverse of postcard is blank, except for pre-printed description.

See Geneabloggers for more Wordless Wednesday posts.

Tuesday, December 21

Tombstone Tuesday: Allen/Kirk/Slater, Oshawa Union

Kirk/Slater tombstone,
Oshawa Union Cemetery, Oshawa, Regional Municipality of Durahm (previously East Whitby twp., Ontario co.), Ontario, Canada; visited and photographed by J. L. Cameron, 22 September 2010. Copy in possession of the author.

Kirk / Slater / Till he come / Baby Kirk 1922 / Baby Kirk 1922 / Frank Kirk / 1879 - 1928 / Edith A. Allen / 1887 - 1966 / John Slater / 1882 - 1966


Please Note: The Kirk/Slater/Allen family is not related to me. My own ancestors reside in cemeteries many miles away from my home, and thus, to satisfy my cemetery "cravings" I take photographs in my local cemeteries. If you have someone buried in an Oshawa cemetery, email me - I may have a photograph and if not, I'd be happy to take one for you! Jenn

Sunday, December 19

Research Diary, no. 5

My Research Diary:
Part to-do list...
Part dear diary...
Part Nosy-Nellie...

Weekly events, plans (and a question or two) from my oh-so exciting genealogy (and sometimes non-genealogy) life...

"History is neither written nor made without love or hate."
- Theodor Mommsen (1817-1903)

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~

What happened this week:

Blog housekeeping...

  • Changed my Blogger Profile picture to an actual "me" picture ;) and added the profile widget to the blog's sidebar.
  • I separated out two more lists from the main label gadget:: Locations (other than those covered in "Ontario Counties & Districts") and Cemeteries & Churches.
  • I've added 24 new-to-me blogs to my reading lists - see below (though I'm sure there will be more, as always!)
  • I started charting out a rough draft of a blog schedule - as per one of my goals for the new year...
  • More new followers! Who knew I'd have something interesting to say ;-)   Hello to everyone (new and old) and thanks for reading!  I think I've followed everyone in turn, but if I haven't please let me know!
  • I edited the About page and added a header pic [though it may change, something just isn't sitting right...]
Genealogy:

  • I finished the "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" challenge for week 10 (Family Search Pilot) and posted the challenge for week 11 (Transitional Genealogists Forum)...
  • Regular features included Tombstone Tuesday (Oshawa Union), Wordless Wednesday (a second Valcartier postcard), Tabloid Thursday (1911 fashion), and a 2nd (and just for fun!) Blog Carol (with Bob and Doug McKenzie)...
  • My Brick Walls page is posted (though it's only bare bones at the moment...)
  • More housekeeping: began (or rather, continued...) indexing and properly labelling documents (currently on births); also still working on FGSs...
  • I'm currently reading Alison Gernsheim's classic Victorian and Edwardian Fashion: A Photographic Survey, Dover Publications, 1981 (originally published as Fashion and Reality (1840-1914) by Faber and Faber, 1963).  And of course, all of my ILLO's have come in at the same time, so I'll be doing a lot of reading in the next 3 weeks...
New-to-me blogs:


What's coming up:

  • I was thinking of becoming a FamilySearch Indexer - does anyone else do this? What do you think?
  • Tombstone Tuesday and Tabloid Thursday make an appearance...
  • ...and in the middle, Wordless Wednesday continues with my "mini-series" of Valcartier picture postcards.
  • My results for Week 10 (Transitional Genealogists Forum) of "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" and a new challenge post for Week 12 (Archive & Library Sites).
  • Still mulling over ideas for Military Monday, as well as another personal regular feature inspired by The Wandering Genealogist's Ancestral Profiles... [I like schedules, can't you tell? ;-) ]
  • Barely a week after I posted my Research Plan, the newest CoG edition (due January 1, 2011) was announced - about genealogy plans!  I would like to take part, and I'll probably expand (and add!) to my goals section...
  • Haven't started (and probably won't start until the holidays when I'm off work) working on my planned Resources page...

Weekly Question ('cuz I'm nosy! ;-)

How do you tag/label your blog posts (if you blog) and how do you (if you do) showcase them on the sidebar/bottom of your blog (list vs. cloud, number vs. not numbered, alphabetically vs. most popular, one long list vs. specialized lists, etc.)? 

Whenever I find a new blog, one of first things I do (beside read the posts!) is to see how everything is set up - I'm always on the look-out for ideas!  There's always something different, which is good!

Thanks for reading!
Jenn

Saturday, December 18

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 11 Challenge

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by Geneabloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 11:

Read the back posts from the Transitional Genealogists Forum. This is a message board for genealogists who are taking the steps needed to become professional genealogists. Even if you aren’t interested in that goal, you will benefit from the questions and answers provided on this excellent discussion list. If you have a genealogy blog, write about a question or subject from this board that was helpful for you.

I'll post my results later this week...

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 13 March 2010. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 10 Results

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by GeneaBloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 10:

Investigate Family Search Pilot, which is part of FamilySearch.org. This is a wonderful collection of records which literally grows every day. In the middle left of the page is a link that says “Browse our record collections.” Click it and pick a region. Search collections outside your research interest. Investigate the types of records collected all over the world and see how they differ from those with which you are familiar. If you are a genealogy blogger, pick a type of record from another country and share your observations about it.

Confession time:  I've never really used the Family Search site.  (Bad genealogist, I know ;-)

My excuses include having access to various other websites (LAC, Ancestry, automatedgenealogy, Canada GenWeb, etc.) as well as a close proximity to the Archives of Ontario in Toronto.

So before the change to the beta site, I decided to pick (somewhat randomly) two different records to poke around in:

Louisiana War of 1812 Pension Lists

This is was quite interesting as I've never had a chance to look at pension records - and for the War of 1812! 

Louisiana, War of 1812 Pension Lists, Lists of Pensioners - Pensions to Veterans, 1878-1879 database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/); accessed 18 December 2010.
Click to Enlarge
There are three record groups:
  • List of Pensioners - Pensions to Veterans, 1878-1879 (42 images)
Names of soldiers (and, more usually, their widows) are included along with the pension they received every quarter (6.75 or 7.00 for the first, second and third quarters, and 14.20 or 15.00 for the fourth quarter). Little snippets of extra information are sometimes also included under the "Attorney" column, including a representative's name or the notation "death"/"dead" (presumably when the pension would then cease or move to someone else).
  • List of Pensioners paid by State Auditor, 1876-1877 (52 images)
Includes names of soldiers (and/or their widows) and organized alphabetically by surname and then subsequently by quarter.
  • List of Pensioners under acts of 1873 and 1876 (55 images)
Includes names of soldiers (some widows and other dependants as well, but usually "Wid Solder's Name") and other interesting notations including "Dead", "Doubtful" or "No Doubt" (in regards to a claim?), "Ok" (they got paid?), a question mark, and "Fraud".

The helpful "About this collection" link to the FamilySearch wiki is also included.

New Brunswick Provincial Return of Deaths, 1815-1919

Canada, New Brunswick Provincial Return of Deaths 1815-1919 database from FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org/: accessed 18 December 2010).
Death of Mrs. John (Mary O'Callaghan) Mahoney, 1815, Campbelltown, New Brunswick, image no. 84.
Click to enlarge.
Having become quite used to the layout and formats (which has varied over the years) of Ontario Vital Registration, I was interested to see how another province handled their civil registrations.  The first thing I noticed was that the form was quite static and even over the course of 40-plus years, remained virtually the same.  Fields included:
  • County of registration
  • Name of deceased
  • When and where died
  • Sex and age
  • Occupation
  • Where born
  • Religious demonination
  • Cause of death
  • Duration of illness
  • Physician attending (if any)
  • Signature of party making return
The database itself is divided by years, beginning with a blanket category of "1815-1887" and then yearly from 1888 to 1919 (with no records listed for 1893).  Though the initial group (1815-1887) gives an impression of quite early records, the majority are from the 1880s, with quite a few from the 1870s, and 1860s, a smattering of 1850s, and one (pictured above) from 1815 (a return completed many, many years after the fact, no doubt).

There is also the usual About this collection link to the FamilySearch wiki.

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 6 March 2010. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

Thursday, December 16

Tabloid Thursday: The "latest extreme fashion" of 1911

Tabloid Thursday: Where yesterday's news is today...

T.T. is an experimental weekly meme I'm trying here at "Roots & Stones" (please let me know if there are any themes/memes already around like this - I don't want to reinvent the wheel!). 

I wanted a weekly feature where I could showcase articles, those lovely little social news items (i.e. "Mrs. X and daughter visited Mrs. Y this weekend and will be returning home on Thursday..."), and other interesting newspaper "stuff" I've come across in the course of my research.  Thus, Tabloid Thursday...

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~ 

Source: "The Cobalt Daily Nugget" 29 March 1911, p. 3, columns 1-3
Accessed at Google News archive, 9 December 2010

[Click to enlarge]


Harem Skirt Appears, Attracts Big Crowds
---
Mrs. Charles Stevens Walks From Princess Theatre to Nugget Office in Latest Extreme Fashion
---
      Cobalt saw its first harem skirt yesterday, and more than half the town was out to see this latest creation in women's fashions. Mrs. Charles Stevens, wife of the manager of the Princess Theatre, wore the skirt, and was accompanied on her stroll from the theatre to The Nugget office by Mr. Stevens. It had been announced that at 4.30 she would start up town from the theatre, and when that hour arrived the sidewalks about the Square were lined with women and men anxious to see this garment that has caused so much discussion since its appearance a short time ago in Paris.
      Cameras were at a premium, and every available machine in town was in the hands of some young man, who took advantage of every stop made by Mr. and Mrs. Stevens, to secure a snap. Walking over the Square and followed by a large crowd, the undaunted introducer of the fashion and her husband paid a visit to The Nugget office, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Lawrie. Later a photograph of these four in a group was taken.
Upon her return to the theatre Mrs. Stevens removed her new garment and it was then placed on view in the window of a store on the Square. To-night the harem skirt will be seen at the Princess Theatre in a specialty turn, which Mr. and Mrs. Stevens will present.
      The harem skirt was made by Miss. Angeline Legris, Lang street, and was the subject of many flattering comments. The bodice of the garment is of pongee silk with Empire effect and buttons made of the goods; while the pantaloons are of Copenhagen blue liberty satin with tight lining. This portion of the skirt also bears buttons of the goods, while a large buckle of the same material gives a natty effect to the entire costume.

Wednesday, December 15

Wordless Wednesday: Valcartier Picture Postcard, W. W. 1

"Valcartier Camp - Canada. Grenadiers Off to the Ranges."
 Original in possession of F. Crago, as of 2010. Reverse of postcard is blank, except for pre-printed description.

Tuesday, December 14

Tombstone Tuesday: Roberts/Giles, Oshawa Union

William Roberts and Elizabeth (Giles) Roberts tombstone,
Oshawa Union Cemetery, Oshawa, Regional Municipality of Durahm (previously East Whitby twp., Ontario co.), Ontario, Canada; visited and photographed by J. L. Cameron, 22 September 2010.  Copy in possession of the author.

In Memory / of / William Roberts / Died April 7, 1922 / In His 67th Year / Also His Beloved Wife / Elizabeth Giles / Born May 29, 1854 / Died Dec. 28, 1937.


Note: William Roberts and his wife Elizabeth Giles are not related to me. My own ancestors reside in cemeteries many miles away from my home, and thus, to satisfy my cemetery "cravings" I take photographs in my local cemeteries.  If you have someone buried in an Oshawa cemetery, email me - I may have a photograph and if not, I'd be happy to take one for you!  Jenn

fM's Tradition of Blog Caroling: 12 Days of Christmas...the Canadian version!

While I've already submitted my blog carol (The Huron Carol) previously, I couldn't help but include the Canadian version of the Twelve Days of Christmas! ;-)



"On the late-night sketch-comedy program Second City TV in 1982, the Canadian-rustic characters Bob & Doug McKenzie (Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas, respectively) released a version on the SCTV spin-off album Great White North, in which the gifts included eight comic books, seven packs of smokes (cigarettes), six packs of two-four ("two-four" is Canadian slang for a case of 24 bottles of beer), five golden tuques, four pounds of back bacon, three (pieces of) French toast, two turtlenecks, and a beer in a tree. (They did not get past the eighth day. Bob wanted to include a dozen (12) doughnuts on the twelfth day.)" [courtesy of Wiki]


Also, if you want another (though a little more kid friendly) Canadian version, there is a children's picture book written by Helaine Becker and illustrated by Werner Zimmermann called A Porcupine In a Pine Tree: A Canadian 12 Days of Christmas. Check out Mr. Zimmerman's blog for some of his sketches from the book, which includes Canada at her best (porcupines, moose, beavers, Mounties, Tim Hortons doughnuts, hockey and more!) ;-)

I love everyone's choices so far - and lots of lovely "silent" singing! ;-)

Enjoy!
Jenn

Sunday, December 12

Research Diary, No. 4

My Research Diary:
Part to-do list...
Part dear diary...
Part Nosy-Nellie...

Weekly events, plans (and a question or two) from my oh-so exciting genealogy (and sometimes non-genealogy) life...

"Dance like no one is watching. Sing like no one is listening. Love like you've never been hurt and live like it's heaven on Earth."
- Mark Twain (1835-1910)

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~

What happened this week:

Blog housekeeping...
  • I separated some more labels from the main list: "Ontario Counties & Disticts" and "Memes & Themes" are now distinct label lists, along with "Surnames".
  • I moved some buttons to the bottom of the blog, including blogoversary (only 50 more days!), Geneabloggers, comments, and the moon phases.  I was thinking of moving the Followers gadget down there as well, but I kept it in the sidebar as it breaks up the text...
  • I added an identification/copyright footer.
  • I added 48! new-to-me blogs to my reading lists - see below (though I'm sure there will be more!)
  • I gained (just a few! ;-) new followers - hello to everyone (new and old) and thanks for reading!
  • I added my name to the Geneabloggers Blog Listing - and I appeared in the December 4rd edition of New Genealogy Blogs. Thanks Thomas!
Genealogy:
  • Organization may (finally!) be coming!  I've finally found the type of forms I want to use (actually, I ended up making the templates myself...) and have started to input data.  Along with my Research Plan (see below), I think I'm finally on the road to organization...at least it feels that way!
  • I finished the "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" challenge for week 8 (online maps) and week 9 (genealogy blogs) and posted the challenge for week 10 (Family Search Pilot)...
  • I bought a scanner!  And it was on sale!  Now I can start posting my gadzillion cemetery pics...
  • I created an overall Research Plan, including my "mission statement", my research focus, sources, an organizational plan, and objectives for the coming year.  And since I'm nosy...do you have a general genealogy research plan (whether kept in your brain or jotted down on paper)?  Or do you fly by the seat of your pants? ;-)
  • I posted my first "Tabloid Thursday" - a personal weekly meme designed to showcase everything newspaper: articles, social news, columns, and other little tidbits.  This week it was...1910 BMDs and a "cheerful spinster" wanted
  • Other posts this week included my first Wordless Wednesday and my entry for footnoteMaven's Blog Caroling theme.
New-to-me blogs:

What's coming up:
  • I have two new pages I want to create: i.) a Resources page listing the cemetery transcriptions and books I've acquired, both for my personal memory and also for other researchers (look-ups and such); and ii.) a Brick Walls page, where I can (briefly) lay-out my major research hurdles.
  • My results for Week 10 (Family Search Pilot) of "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" (for which I don't have very long with the brand-new site coming soon!) and a new challenge post for Week 11 (Transitional Genealogists Forum).
  • My first Tombstone Tuesday post! ;-)
  • I would also like to participate in Military Monday, but what I have in mind might take a bit of planning... so stay tuned for that! ;-)
  • For Wordless Wednesday I have a second Valcartier postcard and Tabloid Thursday brings the arrival of Paris fashion to a rough-and-tumble mining town...

My Question (among questions!):

Do you have an ancestor who served in the Great War (World War I)?  My family (except for my step-great-grandfather, but mom's already "claimed" him...) is lacking in Great War soldiers, so I find myself "collecting" other people's ancestors...  Or on the opposing side, was anyone in your family interred as an "enemy alien" during the Great War?

Thanks for reading!
Jenn

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 10 - the Challenge...

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by GeneaBloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 10:

Investigate Family Search Pilot, which is part of FamilySearch.org. This is a wonderful collection of records which literally grows every day. In the middle left of the page is a link that says “Browse our record collections.” Click it and pick a region. Search collections outside your research interest. Investigate the types of records collected all over the world and see how they differ from those with which you are familiar. If you are a genealogy blogger, pick a type of record from another country and share your observations about it.

I'll post my results later this week...

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 6 March 2010. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

Friday, December 10

fM's Tradition of Blog Caroling: The Huron Carol


I've decided to participate in footnoteMaven's Blog Caroling, and from a bevy of favourite songs, I've decided on "The Huron Carol".

"The Huron Carol" is Canada's oldest Christmas song, written in 1643 by Jean de Brébeuf, a Jesuit missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in Canada.  It was originally written in the native tongue of the Huron/Wendat people amongst whom de Brébeuf was stationed and the original song title was "Jesous Ahatonhia" ("Jesus, he is born") in Huron. The melody is based on a traditional French folk song, "Une Jeune Pucelle" ("A Young Maid"). [Brief history courtesy of Wiki]

There's a few different versions, but this is my favourite - in two languages! 
Enjoy!  Jenn



The Huron Carol ('Twas In the Moon of Wintertime)

'Twas in the moon of wintertime when all the birds had fled
That mighty Gitchi Manitou sent angel choirs instead;
Before their light the stars grew dim and wondering hunters heard the hymn,
Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

Within a lodge of broken bark the tender babe was found;
A ragged robe of rabbit skin enwrapped his beauty round
But as the hunter braves drew nigh the angel song rang loud and high
Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

The earliest moon of wintertime is not so round and fair
As was the ring of glory on the helpless infant there.
The chiefs from far before him knelt with gifts of fox and beaver pelt.
Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

O children of the forest free, O seed of Manitou
The holy Child of earth and heaven is born today for you.
Come kneel before the radiant boy who brings you beauty peace and joy.
Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.



Thursday, December 9

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 9 - the results...

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by Geneabloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 9:

Pick five genealogy blogs and read them every day. Meeting new people and networking within the online genealogy community is a great way to expand your own research and experience. Reading the blogs of others will help you get to know others. Try to find some blogs that are out of your area of expertise. Lists of genealogy blogs can be found at Geneabloggers.com and Genealogue’s Genealogy Blog Finder. If you already subscribe to many genealogy blogs, find five new ones that are “outside the box,” perhaps in history or archives. If you have a genealogy blog, write about the blogs you discover and introduce others to them.

The results:

Since I am a (relative) newbie on the geneabloggers circuit, I have been exploring the listings of blogs on both Geneabloggers and the Genealogue, especially those with a Canadian bent (for obvious reasons) and adding to my blog feeder.  Likewise with history blogs, especially those that deal with either Canadian or World War I subjects.  But outside my comfort zone?  This took some searching...

And this is what I've come up with:

Swedish Genealogy @ Of Trolls and Lemons

My step-great-grandfather was supposedly Swedish, but with a name like Frank Johnson, it's going to take some fancy research two-step to track him down! In the meantime, I'll start by reading about Swedish (along with Norwegian and Italian!) genealogy, of which I am completely in the dark.

Podcasts @ The Genealogy Guys Podcast

Isn't it sooo cute!  ;-) 
(And please ignore the cat food in the bottom right corner...)
At this years' staff Christmas party, I was the lucky winner of an iPod Nano! While I have an MP3 player (and will probably keep that for music as well as the handy built-in recorder), this new piece of technology (and thus the exploration of the Apple iStore) led me straight to podcasts and (of course) genealogy podcasts in particular.

I had never paid much attention to podcasts (bad genealogist!), but now I'm listening to the back issues? (shows?) of The Genealogy Guys and while there is a lot of useful information, I also find myself tuning out during the American-specific material (as well as the dated stuff - I've just started 2006).

Australian History @ Yarra Plenty Library Local History Blog

I know zip about Australian history, so when I stumbled upon this library's local history blog, based in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, I knew it had to make the list. As far as I know, I only have one connection to Australia: a first cousin, 3 times removed, whose sister-in-law was apparently born "somewhere" there.

Wisconsin Genealogy and History @ Midwestern Microhistory

I (finally) found the same first cousin (3 times removed) mentioned above in Wisconsin (though he was born in Carleton county and is buried - or at least has a headstone - in Wellington county) with his wife. So in an attempt to education myself about the records available, I'm now reading "Midwestern Microhistory" (and learning about Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan to boot!).

Forensic Genealogy @ Identifinders International

I am a fan of C.S.I. (the older seasons, especially), but I tend to avoid anything DNAish as it pertains to genealogy - it holds no interest for me. However, when I found the Identifinders' Blog while searching GeneaBloggers for "outside-the-box" ideas, I couldn't help but be hooked!

Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 27 February 2010 at GeneaBloggers. I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

Tabloid Thursday: 1910 BMDs & A "cheerful spinister" Wanted...

Tabloid Thursday: Where yesterday's news is today...

T.T. is an experimental weekly meme I'm trying here at "Roots & Stones" (please let me know if there are any themes/memes already around like this - I don't want to reinvent the wheel!). 

I wanted a weekly feature where I could showcase articles, those lovely little social news items (i.e. "Mrs. X and daughter visited Mrs. Y this weekend and will be returning home on Thursday..."), and other interesting newspaper "stuff" I've come across in the course of my research.  Thus, Tabloid Thursday...

~~~~~*~~~~~*~~~~~ 

Source: "Ottawa Citizen" 1 October, 1910, evening edition, p. 4, column 8
Accessed through Google News archive, 7 December 2010
Note: [?] indicates the word/entry could not be read
[Click to enlarge]
MARRIAGE AND DEATHS, 50C BIRTH NOTICES, EACH 25 CENTS.

BORN.
SHEARER-On Sept. 29, 1910, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Shearer, 61 Sherbrooke Ave, a daughter.
HYLAND-On Sept. 27, 1910, to Mrs. and Mrs. Robert Hyland, of 97 James St., a son.

MARRIED.
FISHER-ANDERSON On Wednesday, Sept. 28, 1910, at Christ church cathedral, Victoria, B.C., by Rev. W. W. Boulton, Alice Gwendolen, eldest daughter of W. J. Anderson, of Ottawa, to William Edward Fisher of Prince Rupert B.C.

DIED.
DEVINE-On Sept. 30, 1910, at 74 Baird St., Florence Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Devine, aged 2 years, [?] months.
Funeral Saturday at 3 p.m., to Notre Dame cemetery.

IN MEMORIAM.
In loving memory of the late Richard Hatton, who died Oct. 1, 1906.
Gone but no forgotten.
--Sister, Mrs. R. T. Lyon.
In loving memory of Mrs. Wm. [?], who died Oct. 2, 1908.
Two years have passed and still we miss her,
Friends may think the wound has healed,
But they little know the sorrow
Lies within our hearts concealed.
--Family


Source: "Ottawa Citizen" 1 October, 1910, evening edition, p. 4, column 8
Accessed through Google News archive, 7 December 2010
Note: [?] indicates the word/entry could not be read
From the classified ads to eHarmony: some things never change (except the language!)... ;-)  [I wonder if he got his "correspondence"?]

[click to enlarge]
PERSONAL.
BACHELOR, 37, wishes correspondence from spinster, 20-30 (English preferred), must be thoroughly domesticated, cheerful, tall and attractive.  Photo (to be returned), highest references.  Only those offering same need apply, as this is straight.  Address Box 13, Citizen.

Wednesday, December 8

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 8 - the results...

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 8:

Discover online map collections. Historical maps are wonderful tools for historical research. Fortunately for genealogists, many map collections are located online. Some of the more prominent collections are: the American Memory Collection at the Library of Congress, the David Rumsey Map Collection, and the Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection at the University of Texas at Austin. Take some time to browse each of these collections. You may also want to check the library web site of your local university (or one near your ancestral home) to see what maps they may have online. If you have a genealogy blog, write about any special maps you find during this activity.

The Results:

Even before I surfaced into the world of genealogy, the one resource I loved to look at were the hardbound county map books that are held by the main branch of my public library.  These measured 14" x 18.5" and were published for counties in Ontario originally in the 1870s-1880s.  They were reprinted in the 1970s-1980s by the Belleville company, Mika Publishing, which reprinted a lot of old Ontario books and atlases.

The books were held in a specially-built open-front cabinet with a sloped viewing top - much like a podium (which is, incidently, probably gone; the main branch has been recently undergoing renovations and though I have yet to have a peek, it definitely doesn't fit with the "modern" look of the architect.  Sigh.).  I remember pulling out a book at a time and slowly fliping through the large pages, peering at the tiny names printed in the various lots and reading the general histories and biographies.  I would have loved to take one home, but they were reference copies only.

Fortunately for me (now), there's the Canadian County Atlas Digital Project, provided by the Digital Collections Program, Rare Books and Special Collections Division, McGill University, and hosted through McGill library's website.  Originally launched in 1999, the site offers a short history of the county maps and their publishers, a short list of abbreviations, and the ability to order high-resolution copies.  Viewers can search the collection by either a last name (alone or with further qualifiers) or by place (generally by county, by either a clickable map or a list, or more specifically with pull-down lists by county, township, and/or town).

Fitzroy Township, Carleton County, Ontario, Canada.
Map originally published by H. Beldon & Co., Toronto, 1879. 
Image from The Canadian County Atlas Digital Project, McGill University, 2001. 
Accessed 8 December 2010.  Click to enlarge.
View of Concessions III and IV, Lots 5 and 6,
Fitzroy Township, Carleton County, Ontario, Canada.
"Thos. Granger" (blocked out in red) was my great-great-grandfather, "D[avid]. Story" (blocked out in green, but with his Story brothers all around) was Thomas' father-in-law and thus my great-great-great-grandfather, and "R[ichard]. Barber" (blocked out in blue) was also my great-great-grandfather.  Thomas' daughter Linda and Richard's son Michael were my great-grandparents!

For me (a city gal) to not only be able to see the extent of land that my forefathers owned (coupled with descriptions from the agricultural schedule of the 1871 census), but also the proximity that these families lived within each other has always been quite special to me.  Not only were their farms close by, but they most likely attended the same church (St. Mark's Anglican, ironically in the next township and the next county!) and went to the same social functions.  My "people" were farmers, descended from poor protestant Irish, who left Ireland before the famine to eke out a new life in a strange new country.  They didn't get much mention in the "official" record, and I have very little personal artefacts, so any little link to their lives is, for me, quite precious.


Please Note: This challenge was originally published the week of 20 February 2010 at GeneaBloggers.  I'm continuing the series on my own after a lengthy (cough, cough) break from genealogy...

Wordless Wednesday: Valcartier Picture Postcard, W.W.I

"Valcartier Camp - Canada. Cleaning the Dinner Dishes"
Original in possession of F. Crago, as of 2010.  Reverse of postcard is blank, except for pre-printed description.

Wednesday, December 1

Distractions (Research Diary, No. 3)

After an unexpected absence of almost 10 months, I (think) I'm back... ;-)

Life, work, and other distractions got in the way of any genealogy-ing.  But in the midst of my final week of vacation (and with the impending holidays), I've decided to dust off my research and my blogging...

I've changed the background (since my old background was gone anyways and Blogger changed its layout...), fiddled around with a few odds and ends, while otherwise contemplating my next major move. 

Changes to the sidebar:
  • added a Welcome message
  • got rid of the profile pic and blurb...while adding a link to my blogger profile in the welcome message
  • added decorative dividers (to break up the text)
  • added a brief label legend (it began brief, anyway...)
  • separated surname labels from the rest of the labels
I was also thinking of separating out the location labels from the rest of the labels, but I haven't quite decided yet...

Changes elsewhere:
  • the background and format
  • added the "share buttons" (facebook, email, twitter, etc.) to the bottom of posts

Let me know what you think!

As for the "52 Weeks to Better Genealogy" feature (hosted by Geneabloggers), I am planning to start where I last left off (since it's a very useful series...).

Therefore, I need to finish weeks 8 and 9 (which I both posted initial entries for, but never got around to finishing...ahem).  Since I began initially with week 6, I also think I'll head back to the first and work through weeks 1 thru 5...eventually. ;-)


I think that's all for the moment.  It's getting close to 11 p.m. and my brain shut down for the night about an hour ago...

Jenn ;-)

Saturday, February 27

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy : Week 9 - the challenge...

Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog (and hosted by Geneabloggers) presents "52 Weeks To Better Genealogy", a series of weekly genealogy prompts / suggestions / exercises that (hopefully) will help anyone to become a better researcher.

The challenge for week 9:

Pick five genealogy blogs and read them every day. Meet new people and networking within the online genealogy community is a great way to expand your own research and experience. Reading the blogs of others will help you get to know others. Try to find some blogs that are out of your area of expertise. Lists of genealogy blogs can be found at Geneabloggers.com and Genealogue’s Genealogy Blog Finder. If you already subscribe to many genealogy blogs, find five new ones that are “outside the box,” perhaps in history or archives. If you have a genealogy blog, write about the blogs you discover and introduce others to them.

I'll post my results later this week...